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Writer's Digest presents an excerpt from my webinar, "Three Secrets of the Greats: Structure Your Story for Ultimate Reader Addiction."

Joanna Penn of The Creative Penn, one of the Top 10 Blogs for Writers, interviews me about storytelling, writing, independent editing, and the difference between literary fiction and genre, with an impromptu exercise on her own Work-in-Progress.

Editing client Stu Wakefield, author of the Kindle #1 Best Seller Body of Water, talks about our work together on Memory of Water, the second novel of his Water trilogy.






  • By Victoria Mixon

    One day some years ago, my friend Roz Morris over on Nail Your Novel was talking about an issue that’s extremely important to writers breaking into the industry these days: advice on revision.

    I started to throw in my two cents in a comment and realized quickly that there was way too much to say in a short space, so I’m going to talk about that here today—what’s going on when your agent (or acquisitions editor) gives you advice, whom to listen to and why, and how to stay true to your own creative agenda.

    These are things you should know:

    1. Acquisitions editors are not free to deal solely in issues of craft

      Once upon a time, the job of publishers’ editors was to take diamonds in the rough and help writers shape them into polished works through their professional, artistic understanding of why readers read and what makes storytelling wonderful.

      The assumption was that the higher quality their product, the more they could sell and the more loyal their readers would be.

      Today, the job of publishers’ editors is to find and negotiate savvy financial deals on those books that will sell the most the fastest. They are no longer free to be artists—those who do edit wind up doing it on their own time, outside office hours. Their primary function is to get the books they love accepted for publication by their sales reps and the bookstore reps at their acquisitions meetings. And then to get those books published. (Not all books that are accepted get published, and those that do get published are usually not marketed properly anymore.)

      The assumption is that the more books they can move off the shelves, the more money the publisher makes, even if that means leaving a trail of abandoned, suddenly unemployed authors in their wake—which happens more and more.

      Now, as Poets & Writers has pointed out, under the thumb of the marketers serving the agenda of the modern Big Five (and other publishers following in their footsteps), acquisitions editors are often the least powerful people in the process.

      This means that you can fight them on their ideas for revision if you want.

      But you’re trying to change the minds of the wrong people.

    2. Agents are not editors

      Agents are salespeople. Their job was invented to create a filter between writers who may or may not know what makes a book intriguing to the reader and the publishers who provide that reader with their reading material.

      Agents screen writers and their manuscripts for those books that they believe they can sell most effectively—whether through quality or topic or authors’ names—and simultaneously screen acquisitions editors for the best matches. Then they sell those manuscripts to those editors.

      Once upon a time, agents were the only screening process necessary. There were a lot of writers, yes, but there were also a lot of publishers, and the numbers were much better balanced than they are now. A lot of writers still went directly to publishers. Nobody minded. There was room for everyone, and—as John Gardner said in 1983 in On Becoming a Novelist—if you wrote good books, you would get published.

      This is no longer true.

      As acquisitions editors are forced to edit on their evenings and weekends if they want to edit at all, the burden of editing falls mostly on those who handle manuscripts before the editors ever see them. Agents have been scrambling in recent years to carry this burden, advising writers on what sells best and how to position a book so it’s most likely to not only win the heart of an acquisitions editor but also win the hearts of the sales reps and booksellers’ reps—the marketers.

      Agents know a lot about sales and marketing. They also know a whole lot about the day-to-day fluctuations of the industry. They keep up with developments that nobody else besides the publishers has time to keep up with.

      But they are not trained in craft. So when they advise you on how to shape your book for best sales, most of them really can’t offer much more than, “I love your writing. I believe in your talent. I really, really want this manuscript to succeed.”

      The burden of craft falls entirely on you.

    3. Independent editors/freelance editors know craft

      At least, the qualified ones do.

      Be aware!

      There are far, far too many folks marketing themselves as freelance editors right now without either adequate experience or developed skills.

      This field is brand-new and requires no licensing, no diplomas, no proof of knowledge other than what the freelance editor is willing to put out there. And the field has simply exploded in recent years.

      There are self-proclaimed ‘copy-editors’ right this very minute being paid by innocent writers to conscientiously destroy their manuscripts through blatant ignorance of this work. I know because their disgruntled ex-clients have shown me the damage.

      It’s eye-popping.

      Hire only those freelance independent editors who can prove that they are highly-qualified.

      And ignore the rest.

      Along with the loss of editing at the publisher level has come a tsunami wave of amateur writing in recent years, ever since the explosion of the blogosphere. This means that not only does the burden of editing fall on the writer, but a smaller and smaller percentage of aspiring writers out there have any idea at all what this entails.

      Once upon a time, when someone wanted to become a writer they wanted it badly enough to devote their entire life to learning how to do it well. They didn’t write one book and immediately start trying to sell it. They wrote book after book after book, year after year, learning and honing and suffering for their craft the way that professionals have always learned their trades—the hard way.

      The assumption was that you can’t become a professional author—one who gets paid for the work—if you haven’t developed your skills to compete with current professional authors.

      Now that so much of what’s being published is published for reasons other than quality—topic, marketing, authors’ names—at the same time that many acquisitions editors are free to choose whether or not to even edit, the quality against which aspiring writers measure themselves has dropped precipitously.

      And we need a new screening process in the industry: there are far too many aspiring writers, far too many aspiring agents, far too few publishers. The numbers are skewed to the point that they’ve become unmanageable.

      Just as once some writers skipped agents and went straight to publishers, now some writers skip independent editors and go straight to agents. Nobody minds. There’s room for everyone.

      But when you discuss your manuscript with an accomplished independent editor, you’re not trying to change the wrong person’s mind, and you’re not coping with expertise that focuses entirely upon marketing rather than craft. You’re working with someone who understands your craft better than you do, an artistic mentor who can translate for you the marketing issues that are the bread-&-butter of acquisitions editors and agents into the craft that is yours.

      Most of all, you have an advocate who owes loyalty to no one but you, someone with no ulterior motive, someone who can help you make decisions about balancing craft and marketing—in whatever way best suits your own goals and vision.

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    “The freshest and most relevant
    advice you’ll find.”

    —Helen Gallagher, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

    The Art & Craft of Writing Fiction

    The Art & Craft of Writing Stories


    A. VICTORIA MIXON, FREELANCE INDEPENDENT EDITOR

    VICTORIA’S ADVICE COLUMN

    15 Comments

15 Responses to “3 Things You Need to Know About the New Publishing Industry”

  1. Excellent article Victoria. I just posted it on the Writing Platform facebook page.

  2. Oh, thank you, Michael! How nice of you. 🙂

  3. Christine said on

    Have you published a post on how to check qualifications of an independent editor and red flags to watch for? I had a nightmare experience with a freelance editor, and I think it would be a great service to writers to have a checklist of sorts for some guidance going into these relationships.

  4. Yes, I sure have. I’m really sorry about your nightmare experience.

    Identifying the Best Independent Editors.

  5. Excellent advice! and it’s very interesting how things are changing. I happen to have a very editorial agent, which is intriguing (and apparently unusual these days). But I’m confident she’s helping me hone my novel to the point that it will be more successful when she goes to pitch it. 🙂

  6. Yes, there has been a surge in the last few years since Black Wednesday, 2008, of ex-acquisitions editors becoming agents. This is excellent for networking, which is one of an agent’s core competencies (the others are business negotiation and keeping up-to-the-minute with industry news), and it also fortuitously results in agents who do have experience in the editorial chair.

    The only problem is that when you’re trying to both edit and agent you don’t have enough hours in the day to keep up both ends, so you have to prioritize, and an agent’s primary job is to agent. You must be able to choose the aspect of the industry that intrigues you most and makes best use of your native talents.

    Indie editors don’t have that problem. 🙂

  7. Jeffrey Russell said on

    To borrow the words of that noted husband and wife team famous for their unique delivery of wit and lyrical poetry, Sonny and Cher, “I Got You, Babe.”

  8. :))

    I swear, Jeffrey, you’re the only person I know besides my husband whose head is as chock full of 1970s song lyrics as mine.

    “Don’t think twice, it’s all right.”

  9. Terrific post. I frequently hear that phrase of John Gardner – sad to say some people still believe it.
    I too am lucky enough to have an agent with sound editorial judgement – because he used to be an editor. Many agents in the UK have come from the other side of the fence and have decided that editorial departments have been stripped of all power.
    I worked with another agent who used to be a literary scout – finding talent to pass on to agencies. Yes, another middle man – who would think we needed them? But maybe we do, with the industry in the state it is.
    As for indie editors… it’s a minefield. And no matter how good an editor is, they won’t be right for absolutely everybody. If you’re looking for an indie editor, make sure they’re in tune with what you want to do. I also edit and I receive many more requests than I accept, because I know I won’t be a good fit for the particular author. When I do work with one, it’s always been a fruitful relationship and a great pleasure.

  10. I would love to believe Gardner’s words were still true! Oh, for the good old days.

    Yes, the move from acquisitions editor to agent has happened in the US too. There’s a current boom in new agents. It remains to be seen how many will survive and how many will move on. Writers make such a small percentage of the sales of their books, and agents make only 15% of that. I’m already seeing certain high-profile agents on social media getting out of the game for more regular paychecks.

    A good indie editor knows their own strengths and inclinations and is honest about them. There are certain genres I won’t accept, although my background is pretty diverse so I can work well in most of them. I find it intriguing that when you and I talked about this privately once you said your strengths lie more in YA—and now it turns out you’re an adept with thriller as well!

    Layers within layers. . . 🙂

  11. Hi Victoria,

    The Editors Association of Canada offers a certification process and plenty of ongoing professional development workshops for editors. The certification process is a bit costly, but the workshops are usually quite affordable. So, there is in fact some way of determining whether a person is reasonably qualified or not to edit another person’s work.

  12. Thank you, Susan! I added the link to your comment.

    Now, you’re not kidding about the fees for certification, plus the necessity of being close to one of the testing locations. And I notice there’s no test for Developmental Editing, which would be hard to test for, although it’s the bulk of the work I do and the work most aspiring writers need help with first.

    So this certification is only for Copy Editing and Line Editing.

    Here in the US we have the Editorial Freelancers Assocation. I don’t happen to belong to it—I haven’t gotten around to it, and I’m swimming in business as it is—so I can’t say it’s a definitive ‘Go/No Go’ arbiter, but such an organization can certainly be a helpful part of the due diligence process.

  13. […] editor and author Victoria Mixon in 3 Things You Need to Know About the New Publishing Industry. Might these be early longings for the professional-spine-gone-missing? Now, as Mixon puts it, […]

  14. […] Here is a concise key to how publishing works right now: 1. Acquisitions editors are not free to deal solely in issues of craft (in other words, they don’t edit books that often). […]

  15. Great post! I’m fortunate enough to have an independent editor who I’ve worked with for about 10 years — even if I were trying the traditional route vs. going indie, I still would rely on her for my developmental editing because she’s exceptionally good and we’ve worked together long enough that I trust her in a way I don’t know that I would trust an agent or editor. Getting a good developmental editor, IMHO, is key to reaching full potential as a writer. We as writers need somebody who has enough distance to highlight what’s working and not, and somebody who can push us to make it better. Good developmental editors do that.




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MILLLICENT G. DILLON, represented by Harold Ober Associates, is the world’s expert on authors Jane and Paul Bowles. She has won five O. Henry Awards and been nominated for the PEN/Faulkner. I worked with Dillon on her memoir, The Absolute Elsewhere, in which she describes in luminous prose her private meeting with Albert Einstein to discuss the ethics of the atomic bomb. Read more. . .


SASHA TROYAN is a Professor of English at Montclair University and author of the critically-acclaimed novels Angels in the Morning and The Forgotten Island, both Booksense Selections, beautiful stories based upon her childhood in France. I worked with Troyan to develop her new novels, Marriage A Trois and Semester. Read more. . .


LUCIA ORTH is the author of the debut novel, Baby Jesus Pawn Shop, which received critical acclaim from Publisher’s Weekly, NPR, Booklist, Library Journal and Small Press Reviews. I have edited a number of essays and articles for Orth. Read more. . .


BHAICHAND PATEL, retired after an illustrious career with the United Nations, is now a journalist based out of New Dehli and Bombay, an expert on Bollywood, and author of three non-fiction books published by Penguin. I edited Patel’s best-selling debut novel, Mothers, Lovers, and Other Strangers, published by Pan Macmillan. Read more. . .


SCOTT WILBANKS, represented by Barbara Poelle of the Irene Goodman Literary Agency, is the author of the debut novel, The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster, published by Sourcebooks in August, 2015. I’m working with Wilbanks on his sophomore novel, Easy Pickens, the story of the world’s only medically-diagnosed case of chronic naiveté. Read more. . .


SCOTT WARRENDER is a professional musician and Annie Award-nominated lyricist specializing in musical theater. I work with Warrender regularly on his short stories and debut novel, Putaway. Read more. . .


M. TERRY GREEN enjoys a successful self-publishing career with multiple sci-fi/fantasy series set in the Multiverse, based upon her expertise in anthropology and technology. I worked with Green to develop a new speculative fiction series. Read more. . .


DARREN D. BEYER is an ex-NASA experiment engineer who has worked on every Space Shuttle orbiter but Challenger. In his sci-fi Anghazi Series, Beyer uses his scientific expertise to create a galaxy in which “space bridges” allow interstellar travel based upon the latest in real theoretical physics. Read more. . .


ANIA VESENNY, represented by Beverly Slopen Literary Agency, is a recipient of the Evelyn Sullivan Gilbertson Award for Emerging Artist in Literature and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. I edited Vesenny’s debut novel, Swearing in Russian at the Northern Lights, and her second novel, Sandara. Read more. . .


STUART WAKEFIELD is the #1 Kindle Best Selling author of Body of Water, the first novel in his Orcadian Trilogy. Body of Water was 1 of 10 books long-listed for the Polari First Book Prize. I edited Wakefield’s second novel, Memory of Water, and look forward to editing the final novel of his Orcadian Trilogy, Spirit of Water. Read more. . .


GERALDINE EVANS is a best-selling British author. Her historical novel, Reluctant Queen, is a Category No 1 Best Seller on Amazon UK. I edited Death Dues, #11 in Evans’ fifteen popular Rafferty and Llewellyn cozy police procedurals, which received a glowing review from the Midwest Book Review. Read more. . .


JUDY LEE DUNN is an award-winning marketing blogger. I am working with Dunn to develop and line edit her memoir of reconciling liberal activism with her emotional difficulty accepting the lesbianism of her beloved daughter, Tonight Show comedienne Kellye Rowland. Read more. . .


LISA MERCADO-FERNANDEZ writes literary novels of love, loss, and friendship set in the small coastal towns of New England. I edited Mercado-Fernandez’ debut novel The Shoebox and second novel The Eighth Summer. Read more. . .


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